So many fashion houses have adopted certain features for clothing, which later on become their business cards. It seems simple at first sight, but looking into it, we realize that those are the characteristics that make those brands stand out. Examples of such can be the following: black and red lace in Dolce and Gabbana collections, expressive asymmetry in Antonio Berardi clothes and so on.

In the Seventies, Halston befriended (and dressed) members of the international jet set, including Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli, and Liz Taylor. Dressed in his trademark black turtleneck, he could often be found partying at Studio 54 and enjoying his success with a host of celebrity friends. Licensing deals made him very wealthy, but tragedy lay in the distance…drug addiction and an AIDS diagnosis in 1988 led to his downfall. Unable to cope with the demands of his career, he was fired from his own company…Halston died of AIDS-related complications in 1990.
It is all about showing off your best features. Let all the best things about your out there to get the attention of male. Mostly accompanied by heels, shorts or tight skirts, this style leaves the bare minimum for imagination. Exposure is to be at the maximum and as much as skin is shown. Tight fitting tops are chosen to show off the features like breasts and stomach. This is the type of fashion which is not every woman’s cup of tea. You got a lot of guts to pull off this one.
"Last year was all about the midi dress, but for A/W 19, it's all about the minidress," says Laura Larbalestier, Group Fashion Buying Director at Harvey Nichols. "We have exciting new launches at Harvey Nichols from Retrofete, Rotate and Giuseppe di Morabito, which all involve impactful looks with mini hemlines." Newbie labels are clearly backing shorter hemlines, but the trend also has the strong support coming in from the industry's sassiest established fashion houses, such as Saint Laurent: Anthony Vaccarello's vision for the French brand was nothing if not a total lesson in getting your legs out.
Not only have the buyers found plenty of love for it, but the numbers don't lie: Designers wholeheartedly embraced the shade, with Edited's data showing that Pantone shade 11-0618 were particularly popular. It's technically called "wax yellow" and Edited explained it as a toned-down soft banana shade that has "adopted a more mature aesthetic." I don't know about you, but I'm suddenly hungry.

Fashion designer Jimmy Choo was born in Penang, Malaysia in 1961. He used the craftsmanship he learned from his father, also a cobbler, to create some of the most coveted shoes in the world. Choo opened his first shop in Hackney in 1986 in an old hospital building. Within two years of opening his shop, Choo’s shoes were featured in an eight-page spread in Vogue magazine. Soon, Choo became the darling of the celebrity world, in particular Princess Diana, who donned Choo’s footwear seemingly everywhere she went. Jimmy Choo rose to fame for the quality and style of his handmade women’s shoes.
If there's one styling trick that was put on the map at the tail end of 2018 and looks set to continue well into this winter, it's the idea of the double jumper, or scrumper, as we called it (because it's essentially about tying another jumper around your neck as a scarf). The concept has extended even further since then, with many designer using super-cosy knits from head to toe. The chicest and easiest way to do it is with the same colour or pattern.
Klein received his education at the renowned Fashion Institute of Technology in NYC. His Calvin Klein underwear line, as well as his array of successful perfumes, helped him to build his empire. His ability to choose the sexiest, hippest stars for his ad campaigns also revealed his tremendous savvy and perceptiveness: celebs such as musician/actor Mark Wahlberg and supermodel Kate Moss also benefited from his uncanny ability to read the zeitgeist.
Everyone knows this guy, and I bet you do, too. He’s one of the international fashion icons. Yves Saint Laurent became popular as a designer who re-designed menswear into feminine, beautiful garments for women. His name is also closely associated with the phenomenon of ‘ready-to-wear’ fashion clothing, ‘power suits’ for women and ‘smoking jackets’ for men.
Not only have the buyers found plenty of love for it, but the numbers don't lie: Designers wholeheartedly embraced the shade, with Edited's data showing that Pantone shade 11-0618 were particularly popular. It's technically called "wax yellow" and Edited explained it as a toned-down soft banana shade that has "adopted a more mature aesthetic." I don't know about you, but I'm suddenly hungry.

“Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury.” No quote could be more appropriate from the woman who gave us the little black dress. Born August 19, 1883, in Saumur, France, Coco Chanel is famous for her timeless designs, trademark suits, and little black dresses. Chanel had a brief career as a singer before opening her first clothes shop in 1910. In the 1920s, she launched her first perfume and introduced the Chanel suit and the little black dress.
"We saw the 'army' mood return, but in a more effortless and understated way than previous seasons. A utility and combat mood was a favorite in Milan, particularly from the likes of Prada and Miu Miu, who offered full army-inspired looks. I loved Isabel Marant’s oversized styles which similarly drew inspiration with oversized vests and pocket-detailed trousers. A favourite piece had to be Stella McCartney's full khaki green jumpsuit, which looks great with an oversized jacket in the same hue and a pair of pumps," says Hsu.
Preppy girls, often named simply ‘preps’, love to rock a college-inspired wardrobe. Their hangers are lined side to side with girly blouses with matching collared tees as well as a-line skirts and tights. Her hair is almost always amped up with a cute little headband and she usually wears glasses- whether she really needs to or not! This style may appear geeky and slightly luxurious, but the look itself is really not expensive and extravagant at all.
×