Coming from a mid class family from Dominican Republic, Oscar de La Renta moved to Madrid at the early age of 19 wishing to be a painter. In order to make extra money Oscar de La Renta started doing some work as a fashion designer. In 1965, De la Renta took over Arden, the company he was working for at the time and this open the door to start his own brand. The unique tone of red on his dresses became to be known as “De la Renta red”.
Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-sewing), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.[2][3] Due to the high cost of each garment, haute couture makes little direct profit for the fashion houses, but is important for prestige and publicity.[4]
Fashion design is the art of applying design, aesthetics and natural beauty to clothing and its accessories. It is influenced by cultural and social attitudes, and has varied over time and place. Fashion designers work in a number of ways in designing clothing and accessories such as bracelets and necklaces. Because of the time required to bring a garment onto the market, designers must at times anticipate changes to consumer tastes.
Long vests, which the planners have been playing around with for a couple of seasons now, are perfect for the pre-fall season, particularly in light of the way that pre-fall is the season for outerwear that you have been so amped up for. A possibility for the 70’s jackets and overcoats, long vests have a diminishing effect on the body, especially when left detached. They can be worn in the pre-fall September isolated, displaying the revealed arms, with sweater when it gets colder, or even used for a layered look.

Tom Ford studied design at the before he worked for Perry Ellis andCathy Hardwick. Tom was hired in 1990 to oversee Gucci’s women’s wear collections, and had a breakthrough four years later when he was appointed creative director. The Gucci makeover masterminded by Ford was the biggest fashion success story of the late 90s. His sultry rock-star velvet hip-slung trousers, leather stilettos, and Halston-esque dresses were blockbusters. After Gucci’s buyout of Yves Saint Laurent in 1999, Ford also became creative director of YSL Rive Gauche. In 2005, Ford launched the Tom Ford brand.

Chic is characterized by being trendy and fashionable. It is a type of statement to make oneself look smart and striking. Whoever follows this style makes sure to choose well tailored stylish designs that are pretty classy. Strong colors which are not extravagant, comes as a part of the chic style. It is something that relates to being casual in not so casual way. If you are part of this style, your wardrobe is a symbol of style.
Ralph Lauren is worth $7.5 billion, and he got it all because of his fashion sense. In 1970, the first Polo logo was seen in Lauren’s line of women’s suits that was designed in the classic men’s style. Two years later, the famous short sleeve shirt with the Polo emblem appeared, and it soon became a classic. These shirts have been collected by men all over the world ever since. Lauren, on the other hand, has been collecting rare and classic cars. The collection is so unique that it has been featured in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

Lace is a fairly safe bet each and every autumn/winter, but for 2019, it has been used in so many ultra-pretty ways that we wanted to share. From layered over shirting (Prada) to ruffle upon red ruffle for party dresses (Erdem) and as negligées for day (Philosophy), we imagine this classic fabric trend will not only infiltrate your evening wardrobe but your day one too. Even Victoria Beckham is behind it, so we're ready and waiting to see how she styles it our IRL, perhaps at the airport…
According to Edited, a rise in jewelled heels and Mary Janes alike aligned with the overarching trend for more "feminine apparel." The movement has been translated in many ways, from Sies Marjan's crystal-strapped courts to more kitsch jewel-dotted pumps at Moschino. Often spotted with tights and socks, you're definitely looking at this coming season's party shoes du jour.

Born in Rome in 1890 to an aristocratic mother and an intellectual father, Schiaparelli soon rebelled against the conventional life of the upper classes. Her desire for exploration and experimentation landed her in hot water as a teen, when she published a book of poems with decidedly sensual overtones. Her work deeply offended her parents, who punished her by placing her in a convent. Schiaparelli was so determined to escape from the nunnery that she initiated a hunger strike which resulted in her release. By her early twenties she had fled to London, where she could live under less scrutiny. Later, during a foray in New York, she joined with artist friends and they all made their way to Paris…
This sleek blend of an advanced robe, a conventional kimono and a legitimate coat has been a shockingly in vogue and all around acknowledged pattern since the previous summer. A fancier, single-shaded adaptation of a year ago’s midriff length elegant gowns absolutely worth bringing down from the runways that it is administering this. They are slouchy, ample and lightweight. In spite of the fact that tossed in with these late spring trench coats, only for it, belts, particularly a medium-estimate obi belt, with a bunch in the side, can finish the look.
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Mood board is the summary of your design collections. Put everything together like fabric, trims and also express emotions and mood on your mood board in a way that’s not just beautiful but fascinating. Remember that, your mood board is a selling tool for your ideas, so make it exciting! Mainly it’s a design tool that will help you to stay focused and consistent as your line develops. Generally it is prepare for the communication purposes and explaining your vision to others like retailers, media etc.. It is also use for creating a range or a collection.
Prefer to get a slick working wardrobe in order for autumn? Multiple savvy designers are catering to your needs and stepping up to fill the gigantic fashion hole Phoebe Philo has left in her wake since departing (old) Celiné. Want to be a total show-off for A/W 19? You'll have a great deal to choose from when it comes to loud colours, bold prints and even more statement-making silhouettes. But if you'd like to keep things chic and simple, there are many elegant, quiet pieces to combine together to that effect: You can't go wrong with Burberry's tailoring or (new) Celine's renewed bourgeois vibe.
The Italian-born Frenchman is lauded for his 20th century pieces that looked as though they were from the 25th century. As Cardin rose to fame in the age of the space race, his creations took on an air of futurism. His so-called bubble dresses had all the fixings of science fiction, combining earthly elegance with out-of-this-world colors and avant garde design. They may be wacky, sure, but Cardin’s clothes showed a freedom of expression that highlighted larger ideals, in particular the emancipation of women. The visionary designer fell out of critical favor when he attached his name to less fashionable items, from cars to umbrellas, but his futuristic, space-centric legacy will live to infinity and beyond.

To develop a successful design, balance and fitting garment, three dimensional prototypes are essential. Prototypes are also known as toiles. It is the correct distribution of the waist suppression. This method is used in order to cut or smooth away the excess fabric at the waist. Get a perfect shape of the garment to follow the natural curves of the figure, make darts, side seams and the hollow of the back.

Valentino started his brilliant and admirable career in the world of fashion in 1950 when he moved to Paris to study design. His classically elegant and feminine designs made women look utterly glamorous. The Italian maestro worked at houses Dessus and Laroche before going back to Rome to set up his business in 1959. By the mid-1960s, Valentino was a favorite designer of the world’s best-dressed women, including Jacqueline Kennedy. Among his signatures is a particular fabric shade, known as “Valentino red.”


Purple isn't for everyone, but it certainly made a bold splash across the runways of A/W 19. Major names stood behind the regal hue, including Dries Van Noten and Comme des Garçons. Many of the purple-centric outfits you'll come across featuring a spectrum head from to toe, with different shades thrown in for good measure—but IRL, we predict this shade will become more of an accent to darker winter wardrobes, so feel free to translate this into your own closet alongside black, white, navy and brown.

Basically for the ones who do not want to be dressed like a woman. They do not abide by the usual norms of what a woman should wear. To put it lightly, they prefer black over pink. Most of their clothing are a bit baggy and focuses more on graphic T-Shirts and Shirts from the boy’s selection. They do not prefer light colors and frills or laces. It can ask so be described as simple and modern. A boyish look is what they prefer over the classy, elegant looks.
His interest in sewing and fashion started at an early age; as a young boy, he tailored clothes and created hats for his mother and sisters to wear. After graduating from high school, Frowick went to University in Indiana, but he lasted only one semester. Dropping out of University led him to a more creative life: he took night school courses at an art institute in Chicago and began to work as a window-dresser.
"Leather has become a key player in our wardrobes; it’s now much more accessibly priced and the breadth of styles means we can wear it all year long. Designers manipulated this fabrication which draped and felt like wool, cotton or silk," says von der Goltz. "Faux leather continues to be a rising trend, with Nanushka leading the way. Nearly half of our Nanushka buy for A/W 19 is made up of vegan leather looks."
London has long been the capital of the United Kingdom fashion industry and has a wide range of foreign designs which have integrated with modern British styles. Typical, British design is smart but innovative yet recently has become more and more unconventional, fusing traditional styles with modern techniques. Vintage styles play an important role in the British fashion and styling industry. Stylists regularly 'mix and match' the old with the new, which gives British style that unique, bohemian aesthetic that many of the other fashion capitals try to imitate. Irish fashion (both design and styling) is also heavily influenced by fashion trends from Britain.
Preppy girls, often named simply ‘preps’, love to rock a college-inspired wardrobe. Their hangers are lined side to side with girly blouses with matching collared tees as well as a-line skirts and tights. Her hair is almost always amped up with a cute little headband and she usually wears glasses- whether she really needs to or not! This style may appear geeky and slightly luxurious, but the look itself is really not expensive and extravagant at all.
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