It was a season where emotions, personalities and uniqueness reigned supreme. The monthlong round of shows culminated in a heart-warming and outstanding Chanel show—the last ever technically created by the late creative director, Karl Lagerfeld. An alpine scene magically assembled within Paris's Grand Palais featured a lineup of Chanel girls old and new, and a finale to rival any—with the likes of Karen Elson, unable to hold back the tears, walking through the "snow" next to Cara Delevingne, Mica Argañaraz and Penelope Cruz, to name but a few high-profile faces. The show also confirmed that one of the designer's most beloved of fabrics—bouclé—was set to be a trending choice for A/W 19.

Being way more than a famous shoe designer, Manolo Blahnik is the man who can single-handedly make a woman feel instantly sexy with his ultra sophisticated, wildly fun high heel shoes. Becoming a household name through shows like Sex and the City and his never ending list of celebrity endorsements, Manolo Blahnik has become one of the most influential shoe designers of our time. Unfortunately it is known in fashion circles that when Blahnik dies there will be no more Manolos. There is no protégé or heir and no desire from the great designer to have the label continue without him.


Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.

A designer with a notorious past, Christian Dior was also known for being in cahoots with the enemy during WWII, when he dressed Nazi wives and French collaborators in his designs. Despite this questionable choice, he still rose to prominence during the late-forties when the war was over…primarily due to his unparalleled mastery of line and shape. He gave women a desirable “flower silhouette” which always featured a nipped-in waist, a full, voluminous skirt, and a feminine, corseted bodice. Often, the hips of his suits and dresses were padded to balance the bust line and accentuate the wasp-waisted effect.
This sleek blend of an advanced robe, a conventional kimono and a legitimate coat has been a shockingly in vogue and all around acknowledged pattern since the previous summer. A fancier, single-shaded adaptation of a year ago’s midriff length elegant gowns absolutely worth bringing down from the runways that it is administering this. They are slouchy, ample and lightweight. In spite of the fact that tossed in with these late spring trench coats, only for it, belts, particularly a medium-estimate obi belt, with a bunch in the side, can finish the look.
Considered by many one of the greatest tailors of the century, Pierre Balmain was born in Saint Jean de Maurienne, France in 1914. After studying at the school of Architecture, in Paris he founded in 1945 the Maison Balmain as a couture house, with a lucrative sideline in fragrances. In that year he showed long, bellshaped skirts with small waists; a line that became popular in 1947 as part of Dior’s New Look.

"There is a micro-trend evolving by way of unexpected fabrics. Real or faux leather seemed to be the material of the moment," confirms Aiken. "Found by way of trenches, blouses, skirts and dresses. Among my favorites include Nanuskha’s vegan leather in the brand's cult-favorite puffa or streamlined leather dress, as well as the bold variations of color from Khaite and Proenza Schouler." Last year, the trend extended down to lower price points and the high street, so we're expecting the leather look to spread far and wide.
The top icon of fashion design, Elsa Schiaparelli was born on September 10, 1890, in Italy. After working at a boutique in New York, Schiaparelli moved to Paris, where she began designing her own clothes. Her work and sense of style shaped the look of fashion in the 1920s and ’30s, and her clothes were worn by some of the world’s most famous women, including American actress Greta Garbo. Schiaparelli died in Paris on November 13, 1973.
Currently the fashion industry relies more on mass market sales. The mass market caters for a wide range of customers, producing ready-to-wear garments using trends set by the famous names in fashion. They often wait around a season to make sure a style is going to catch on before producing their own versions of the original look. To save money and time, they use cheaper fabrics and simpler production techniques which can easily be done by machine. The end product can therefore be sold much more cheaply.[7][8][9]
To start designing it is important to understand the construction techniques to create basic skirts, bodices, jackets and coats, sleeves, trousers and collars. It is the key elements that form Western dress. To create a three dimensional shape on the figure and illustrate contemporary fashion design should know basic garment cutting and fitting method. Also follow the two-dimensional planning of construction, fastenings, performance and movement.
A girly fashion style can most easily be described as the popular vintage style. Most of her outfits consist of plenty of beautiful lace as well as ruffles, hearts, flowers, and pale colors, especially pink and white. She’s a romantic at heart and wants to be treated like a lady at all times. She’s awaiting her prince charming and thus, adorns herself with only the girliest and most lovely fashions.
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