One of our favorite italian fashion designers, Miuccia Prada was once a member of the Italian Communist Party and a mime student. She was an unlikely entrepreneur when she took over her family’s luggage business in 1978. She first dazzled the fashion world in 1985 with a series of black nylon handbags and backpacks. Prada is now a billion-dollar company. Beginning with Prada’s first ready-to-wear collection in 1989, she established a techno minimalism based on pared-down design, innovative fabrics, and computer-enhanced patterns that have become influentially iconic.
"Floral dresses are a wardrobe staple no matter the season, and for autumn, they were back and bigger than ever, referencing the '40s and an homage to swing dancing in particular, with midi lengths as the key shape from the likes of Dries Van Noten, Miu Miu and Erdem," says Hsu. "Alessandra Rich remains a key favourite when it comes to her feminine and wearable floral dresses, which offer the perfect desk to dinner outfit worn with heeled boots. Satin was also key fabric this season, with a mix of high-neck and V-neck iterations."
Fashion designer Jimmy Choo was born in Penang, Malaysia in 1961. He used the craftsmanship he learned from his father, also a cobbler, to create some of the most coveted shoes in the world. Choo opened his first shop in Hackney in 1986 in an old hospital building. Within two years of opening his shop, Choo’s shoes were featured in an eight-page spread in Vogue magazine. Soon, Choo became the darling of the celebrity world, in particular Princess Diana, who donned Choo’s footwear seemingly everywhere she went. Jimmy Choo rose to fame for the quality and style of his handmade women’s shoes.
In 1966 Paco Rabanne opened his own outlet at the age of 32, where he earned international repute for his metal-linked plastic-disc dresses, sun goggles and jewelry made of plastic in primary colors. Paco Rabanne’s dresses made of small plastic tiles linked together by chains, stole the show in Paris. His first collection, titled “12 Unwearable Dresses in Contemporary Materials,” sums up his philosophy that “the only new frontier left in fashion is the finding of new materials.” Throughout his career, Rabanne experimented with everything from plastic and aluminum to fiberglass and paper to create futuristic, eccentric, yet highly influential garments.

Everyone knows this guy, and I bet you do, too. He’s one of the international fashion icons. Yves Saint Laurent became popular as a designer who re-designed menswear into feminine, beautiful garments for women. His name is also closely associated with the phenomenon of ‘ready-to-wear’ fashion clothing, ‘power suits’ for women and ‘smoking jackets’ for men.
Intelligent and pragmatic, Chanel used her powers of seduction to gain a foothold in the competitive fashion world; in succession, she became the mistress of two powerful and wealthy men. Both of her lovers were quite happy to use their money and influence to give her a start in business. From a beginning as a milliner, she rose to prominence in 1920, when her signature fragrance, the incredibly iconic Chanel No. 5, was launched.
Thomas Burberry was born in 1835 in Brockham Green, Surrey. Burberry opened his own small clothing outfitters in Basingstoke in 1857. At that time Basingstoke was a small country town. Nowadays, the Burberry Group is a leading global fashion brand which now sells womenswear, menswear, non-apparel and children’s wear. It is famous for its iconic trademarked check design and British heritage branding.

“We love the body of a woman. Coco Chanel was wrong when she said that men were unable to design for women. Women know too much about women and they transpose their needs onto women’s clothes” The idea of women power and women shapes is as good to Dolce and Gabbana as it is for us. In 1985, their first collection was shown in Milan and built their themes on screen sirens, Sicilian widows and a rosary of Catholic kitsch. Dolce and Gabbana are arguably the most powerful and influential designers of our time.
Giorgio Armani, an outstanding Italian fashion designer, particularly noted for his menswear for his clean, tailored lines. He formed his company, Armani, in 1975, and by 2001 was acclaimed as the most successful designer to come out of Italy, with an annual turnover of $1.6 billion and a personal fortune of $7 billion as of 2012. Armani is also the first ever designer to ban models who has a Body Mass Index under 18. He is truly a living legend and a great fashion designer.

Lace is a fairly safe bet each and every autumn/winter, but for 2019, it has been used in so many ultra-pretty ways that we wanted to share. From layered over shirting (Prada) to ruffle upon red ruffle for party dresses (Erdem) and as negligées for day (Philosophy), we imagine this classic fabric trend will not only infiltrate your evening wardrobe but your day one too. Even Victoria Beckham is behind it, so we're ready and waiting to see how she styles it our IRL, perhaps at the airport…


One of the most adorable fashion styles, it definitely is a blast from the past. From flapper dresses to pinup clothing and from retro swimwear to indie clothing, the vintage look is a culmination of fashion from the 20’s to the 70’s. It is the one trend that overcame the test of time. Look these celebrities who are feature for their vintage style.
"A/W is always a moment for incredible outerwear, and this season it was no exception. For the most part, it was the bigger the better; oversized shapes, duvet dressing, blanket capes and more," says Elizabeth von der Goltz, Net-a-Porter global buying director. "Oversized cannot be mentioned without talking to the trench coat and the bigger the better with billowing sleeves at JW Anderson, cape draping at Burberry and classic maxi coats at Khaite. Big coats marked the opening of the Max Mara runway in blue, yellow and teal. Hot pink was the favourite at Jacquemus and Valentino, whose oversized silhouettes gave this typically feminine colour a masculine twist. And last but not least is the puffa jacket, which received an elegant update with a new reference to duvet dressing. Padding, quilting, floral embroidery and organza layering came from the likes of Margiela, Dries Van Noten and Toteme."
London has long been the capital of the United Kingdom fashion industry and has a wide range of foreign designs which have integrated with modern British styles. Typical, British design is smart but innovative yet recently has become more and more unconventional, fusing traditional styles with modern techniques. Vintage styles play an important role in the British fashion and styling industry. Stylists regularly 'mix and match' the old with the new, which gives British style that unique, bohemian aesthetic that many of the other fashion capitals try to imitate. Irish fashion (both design and styling) is also heavily influenced by fashion trends from Britain.
Known for his stunning couture designs and his sophisticated women’s tuxedo jackets (known as le smoking), Saint Laurent was destined to carve out his own identity, but his career was not without its challenges. After a poorly received collection at Dior, which featured hobble skirts and other unusual designs, he was sent into mandatory military service. The stress of being in the army (although he lasted only 20 days) took a tremendous toll on the sensitive designer. He suffered from teasing and hazing by his fellow soldiers, and he soon plunged into a nervous breakdown; he was sent to a mental hospital for treatment.
Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.
×